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Results of vaccine effectiveness studies are critical to the CDC’s vaccine program and national vaccine policy decision-making.

The overall goal of CDC’s vaccine effectiveness program is to generate the comprehensive evidence needed to inform COVID-19 vaccine policy decisions and CDC guidance on other prevention measures. To accomplish this, CDC in collaboration with public health and academic partners, conducts observational studies to evaluate the real-world effectiveness of authorized and licensed COVID-19 vaccines in the United States.

CDC is committed to routinely evaluating vaccine effectiveness to detect changes that could be due to:

Emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants Waning of vaccine protection

This work helps CDC identify population subgroups who may benefit from additional doses in the future.

Updates summarizing the results of CDC led vaccine effectiveness evaluations are provided on COVID Data Tracker.

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What is V-safe?

V-safe is a safety monitoring system that lets you share with CDC how you, or your dependent, feel after getting an RSV vaccine.

After you register, V-safe will send you personalized and confidential health check-ins via text messages or emails to ask how you feel after vaccination. Completing health check-ins and sharing how you feel, even if you don’t experience side effects after vaccination, helps CDC’s vaccine safety monitoring efforts and lets others know what to expect in the days and weeks following RSV vaccination.

V-safe originally launched in December 2020 to monitor the safety of COVID-19 vaccines. Since its launch, 10.1 million V-safe participants completed more than 151 million health surveys about their experiences following COVID-19 vaccination, and V-safe data have been included in more than 20 scientific publications.

V-safe is one of several complementary safety systems CDC uses to closely monitor the safety of vaccines in the United States. It lets vaccine recipients self-report how they feel after receiving a vaccine.

What you need to know You can register for V-safe using your computer, tablet, or smartphone after getting an RSV vaccine. Using V-safe after RSV vaccination requires a new registration, even if you previously enrolled and participated in V-safe for the COVID-19 or mpox vaccines. You can add a dependent (family member, friend, or individual who relies on you for support) ages 60 years

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Caring for Children or Adolescents with Long COVID

Although Long COVID appears to be less common in children and adolescents than in adults, long-term effects after COVID-19 do occur in children and adolescents. Young children may have trouble describing the problems they are experiencing.

If your child has Long COVID and it impacts their ability to attend school, complete schoolwork, or perform their usual activities, it may be helpful to discuss possible accommodations with your child’s healthcare provider and school. Such accommodations may include extra time on tests, scheduled rest periods throughout the day, a modified class schedule, and others. School administrators, school counselors, and school nurses can work with families and healthcare professionals to provide learning accommodations for children with Long COVID, particularly those experiencing thinking, concentrating, or physical difficulties. You may also request similar accommodations for activities outside of school, such as day care, tutoring, sports, scouting, etc.

For more information, visit the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights (OCR) and the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS)’s Resource to Support Children, Students, Educators, Schools, Service Providers, and Families [PDF, 237KB, 10 pages].

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